Blue Glass Splashbacks

Blue is more popular than you think – in both Europe and America it was voted the favourite by over half the population. One of the more cooler colours in the palette, it is usually a better choice for the bathroom rather than the kitchen. But that’s not to say that you can’t break with tradition and use it along with warmer complementary tones to give your kitchen an unusual look.

A bit about blue

Blue made a fairly late entry into the world of interiors, because it wasn’t easy to make. Blue dye was first produced from plant sources like woad or indigo and from minerals like lapis lazuli and azurite.

In the Middle Ages, blue was worn by the working classes while aristocrats traditionally dressed in red and purple. This trend reversed when King Louis IX of France started wearing the colour. From then on, it began to appear in paintings depicting royalty and in church paintings.

Blue Glass Bathroom Splashbacks

Blue glass splashbacks are one of the most popular colours used in bathroom décor. As a splashback it works well on its own or with complementary colours like white or green. Blue generally has a soothing effect so can be used in areas around the bath and in the shower. Lighter shades of blue are fairly neutral and can be used over large areas of the bathroom, without overwhelming the interiors. Blue is a good choice both for small modern toilets and bathrooms as well as larger, more traditional spaces. Nautical themes of décor work well with blue splashbacks, and are a popular choice for bathrooms anyway, so it might be a good idea to use the two together.

Blue Glass Kitchen Splashbacks

Blue glass splashbacks are an unusual choice for the kitchen but it can be used, especially with contrasting or complementary warmer tones. Used with red, green and yellow and with matching furnishings and fittings, it can give your kitchen a distinctive and unusual look. Blue splashbacks can be used around the kitchen sink, as the colour has a natural association with water. It can also be used around the hob, the dining area and to give depth and dimension to corner walls. Traditionally blue is used in larger, country kitchens, though brighter hues, like electric and cobalt blue can add spark to smaller, modern spaces.